Wabash County Health Department complies with all applicable Federal Civil Rights laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, national origin, religion, age, disability, gender, sexual identity or sexual orientation. For more information on Section 1557 of the Affordable Care Act, click here.

Environmental Health & Food Sanitation

The Public Health Division of Wabash County Health Department provides inspections to all establishments that serve food to community members-examples include, Restaurant Inspections, Schools and Nursing homes and retail food stores such as CVS, Dollar Stores, Gas Stations, and Shopko.  All establishments are inspected on a regulated basis by Marina Sample, Director of Environmental Health. If you have questions or concerns you can reach Marina by calling 618-263-3873 ext. 119

Temporary Food Service Establishment

The Cottage Food Operation Act became effective in Illinois on January 1, 2012. The Act requires Cottage

Food Operations to register with local health departments before selling products to the public at a

Farmers Market. The Act only applies to food sold at a Farmers Market. Click below to download the

registration form, cottage food operation information handout, food service sanitation class list. If you

have any questions, please contact the Wabash County Health Department Environmental Health Division.

 

 

 

ALL FOOD BOOTHS MUST SUBMIT AN APPLICATION FOR PARTICIPATION IN EVENTS, SUCH AS, AG DAYS AND RIBBERFEST.

To print out your Temporary Food Service Establishment Application please click below.

Bake Sale Best Practices

Frequently asked questions.

                           

                                 

                                      

IS A PERMIT NEEDED FOR A BAKE SALE?

No, you do not need a permit for occasional bake sales as fundraisers. The Health Dept does not regulate Bake Sales or Fundraisers.

 

WHAT TYPES OF ITEMS CAN BE SOLD?

Baked goods, such as, but not limited to, breads, cookies, cakes, pies, and pastries. Only high-acid fruit pies that use the following fruits are

allowed: apple, apricot, grape, peach, plum, quince, orange, nectarine, tangerine, blackberry, raspberry,  boysenberry, cherry, cranberry,

strawberry, red currants or a combination of these fruits.

 

WHAT ITEMS ARE PROHIBITED?

Pumpkin, sweet potato, custard or cream pies and pastries, cheesecake, meringues or other potentially hazardous fillings or toppings.

 

HOW SHOULD THE BAKED GOODS BE DISPLAYED?

Individually pre-wrap them (plastic wrap, plastic bags, etc.). Don't have open foods on tables; everything should be packaged.

 

SHOULD THE ITEMS BE LABELED, AND IF SO, WHAT SHOULD BE ON THE LABELS?

1.) Best Practice (though not required) is to label items with the baker's name and address, the common name of the food product, ingredients, the date it was produced, and allergen labeling..Best Practice SAMPLE LABEL Cinnamon Rolls -Net Wt. 12 oz. Flour (wheat flour, niacin, reduced iron, thiamine, mononitrate, riboflavin and folic acid), sugar, butter, eggs, milk, yeast, cinnamon and salt Contains: wheat, eggs, milk John Dough 123 Cookie Street, Cakesville, IL 60000 Production Date: 01/01/2012 This product was produced in a home kitchen not subject to public health inspection that may also process common food allergens.

 

2.) Adding the following phrase: "This product was produced in a home kitchen not subject to public health inspection that may also process common food allergens." is a good idea as well.

 

3.) Major allergens in baked goods include peanuts (peanut butter), eggs, wheat, soybeans, milk and milk products (e.g. butter, buttermilk), and tree nuts (e.g. almonds, pecans, walnuts, and cashews).

 

4.)If a packaged brownie, cake, cookie mix, or pie crust is used, you could include a copy of the information panel from the box as well as any added ingredients like eggs, oil, nuts, etc.

 

5.) It is a good idea for the event organizer to retain a list of bakers' contact information.

 

6.) Signage stating "Products produced in a home kitchen not subject to Health Department inspection" should be on display in the sales area.

 

      Use common sense: no eating, drinking, or smoking in the sales area.

 

   Wash hands often and especially after using restrooms.

 

     Display foods on clean counters and keep the sale area clean.

 *What is Chronic Wasting Disease?

Chronic wasting disease is a fatal neurological disease found in cervids (deer and elk). It belongs to the family of diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) or prion diseases. Though it shares certain features with other TSEs, like bovine spongiform encephalopathy (Mad Cow Disease) or scrapie in sheep, it is a distinct disease apparently affecting only deer and related species. CWD has been diagnosed in captive or wild free-ranging deer and/or elk in Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, Utah, New Mexico, Texas, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Wisconsin, Illinois, Michigan, West Virginia, Virginia, Pennsylvania, New York, Maryland, and Canadian provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan.