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Gonorrhea

"Gonorrhea is a sexually transmitted disease (STD) that can infect both men and women. It can cause infections in the genitals, rectum and throat. It is a very common infection, especially among young people ages 15-24 years."

 

"Gonorrhea can spread by having anal, vaginal or oral sex with someone who has gonorrhea."

 

 

If you are sexually active, you can do the following things to reduce your risk of contracting gonorrhea:

 

* Being in a long-term mutually monogamous relationship with a partner who has been tested and has negative STD test results;

 

* Usually latex condoms and dental dams the right way every time you have sex.

 

Symptoms in MEN may include:

 

* A burning sensation when urinating;

* A white, yellow or green discharge from the penis

* Painful  or swollen testicles ( although this is less common)

 

Symptoms in WOMEN may include:

 

* Painful or burning sensation when urinating;

* Increased vaginal discharge;

* Vaginal bleeding between periods.

 

Most women with gonorrhea do not have any symptoms. Even when a woman has symptoms, they are often mild and can be mistaken for a bladder or vaginal infection. Women with gonorrhea are at risk of developing serious complications from the infection, even if they don't have any symptoms.

 

Rectal infection symptoms may include:

* Discharge;

* Anal Itching;

* Soreness;

* Bleeding;

* Painful bowel movements.

 

 

Gonorrhea can be cured with the right treatment. It is important that you take all of the medication that is prescribed to cure your infection. Medication for gonorrhea should not be shared with anyone. Although medication will stop the infection, it will not undo any permanent damage caused by the disease.

 

It is becoming harder to treat gonorrhea, as drug-resistant strains of gonorrhea are increasing. If your symptoms continue for more than a few days after receiving treatment, you should return to your health care provider to be checked again.

 

 

When left untreated:

 

Untreated gonorrhea can cause serious and permanent health problems in both men and women.

 

In women, untreated gonorrhea can cause pelvic inflammitory disease (PID). Some of the complications of PID are:

*Formation of scar tissue that blocks the fallopian tubes;

*Ectopic Pregnancy (Pregnancy outside of the womb)

*Infertility (inablitiy to get pregnant)

*Long-term pelvic/ abdominal pain

 

In men, gonorrhea can cause a painful condition in the tubes attached to the testicles. In rare cases, this may cause a man to be sterile or prevent him from being a father to a child.

 

Rarely, untreated gonorrhea can also spread to your blood or joints. This condition can be life-threatening. Untreated gonorrhea may also increase your chances of getting or giving HIV - the virus  that causes AIDS.

 

This information was gathered from www.cdc.gov