Wabash County Health Department complies with all applicable Federal Civil Rights laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, national origin, religion, age, disability, gender, sexual identity or sexual orientation. For more information on Section 1557 of the Affordable Care Act, click here.

HIV/AIDS

How Can I Tell If I'm Infected?

The only way to know if you are infected with HIV is to be tested. You cannot rely on symptoms to know whether you have HIV. Many people who are infected with HIV do not have any symptoms at all for 10 years or more. Some people who are infected with HIV report having flu-like symptoms (often described as “the worst flu ever”) 2 to 4 weeks after exposure. Symptoms can include:

  • Fever

  • Enlarged lymph nodes

  • Sore throat

  • Rash

 

These symptoms can last anywhere from a few days to several weeks. During this time, HIV infection may not show up on an HIV test, but people who have it are highly infectious and can spread the infection to others.

 

However, you should not assume you have HIV if you have any of these symptoms. Each of these symptoms can be caused by other illnesses. Again, the only way to determine whether you are infected is to be tested for HIV infection. For information on where to find an HIV testing site,

 

 

You can get tested for HIV at:

Wabash County Health Department

 Located at:    

130 W. 7th Street,

Mt. Carmel, IL 62863.

call and schedule an appointment today!

 618-263-3873 

What is HIV?

 

HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus. It is the virus that can lead to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or AIDS. Unlike some other viruses, the human body cannot get rid of HIV. That means that once you have HIV, you have it for life.

 

 

 HIV can be controlled. Treatment for HIV is often called antiretroviral therapy or ART. It can dramatically prolong the lives of many people infected with HIV and lower their chance of infecting others. Before the introduction of ART in the mid-1990s, people with HIV could progress to AIDS in just a few years. Today, someone diagnosed with HIV and treated before the disease is far advanced can have a nearly normal life expectancy.

 

 

HIV affects specific cells of the immune system, called CD4 cells, or T cells. Over time, HIV can destroy so many of these cells that the body can’t fight off infections and disease. When this happens, HIV infection leads to AIDS.